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20121120
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as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "the new york times," the former undersecretary deputy secretary of state for global affairs now a fellow at the center at harvard. the head of telefax holders distinguished sibling, the munich security conference where they have a great group. the point of the session is to do some big thinking on
honestly is the lack of an overall information technology architecture you and i have talked about this before, and it still doesn't exist today as far as i know. i've pointed that out and my committee has pointed that out and outside they've looked at the va's i.t. department and have pointed that out. i'm just not convinced that five years from now given that i don't know where you will be, but my fear is that we are going to be sitting here talking about the same issue again because we are not going about it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on i
of the information technology boom, creation of private credit and, therefore, rapid increase in tax revenues. and so what stephanie showed, this was something that was not forecast at the time. at the time those who were there in 2000 remember that the secretary of the treasury at the time was -- and the chairman of the federal reserve -- were talking about a 13-year horizon for the complete elimination of the public debt. and the congressional budget office was not forecasting that the information technology boom was an aberration that would come to an end, but it did. and from 2000 forward we were back into the much more normal position of the united states government running substantial budget deficits. and as the private sector rebuilt its financial position. so that's the first point is that long-term forecasts, the idea that one can control the future position of the debt and the deficit by actions taken today is an extremely tenuous and debatable idea. second point is that there are certain assumptions being made which create extremely ostensibly scary scenarios. those numbers that show and,
was put in place in 1992. it was to be a temporary measure. it was going to boost the new technology. 20 years later, president obama's respected energy secretary says wind is a mature technology. and what have we got after 20 years and billions of dollars of subsidies? a puny amount of unreliable electricity. our country uses nearly 25% of all the electricity in the world. wind produces 3% of that. of course, it only produces it when the wind blows. it's not easy to store it. so it is of limited use in a country that needs huge amounts of low-cost, clean, reliable electricity. relying on wind power is the energy equivalent of going to war in sailboats when nuclear submarines are available. the wind subsidy is so large, mr. president, that wind developers are now paying distributors to take their wind power under cutting the base load energy plants that are necessary to provide the reliable electricity we need for the country. and on top of that, there are better ways to produce clean electricity, better ways than subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of savi
a lot of people talk about the science technology. >> engineering. >> engineering and math. right. [laughter] i do think -- i am all for studying all these interesting things, but i do think that having those kinds of skills -- the countries we worry about competing with us a lot of their focus is on those things that actually have real world usefulness in the economy, and germany for a long time i spent a reasonable amount of time in germany they've emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds and certainly china is doing it and as i said i'm also with historians and even economists. [laughter] but i do think that having a strong base of people with those kind of skills would be a great thing. >> i think the most important point is education matters a lot. if you look at the unemployment break down in the u.s. right now it is skewed very much to words high school graduates are sort of a range of numbers but i think it's around 13, 14%. and as you get up past high school graduate, college graduate advanced degree it drops precipitously in the there is a gap we have right now i
mccain in ohio and still came within two points. the technology included so-called orca system. some of you maybe read about that in the last couple days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to insure that we were targeting people getting to the polls. it imploded on election day. it got so many hits from around the country as it should have saying gee this person voted. this person didn't vote. target calls. we thought it was under attack and closed down. so for those of you here from, again, the technology field and with interest in politics, we republicans want to talk to you. [laughter] we need some help. the democrats system i think is called gorton was quite effective at microtargeting. i heard a lot of anecdotes. i heard one this morning that you will love. someone gets a call a democrat in law school. gee, we see you voted. by the way this information is publicly voted. it is at 2:00 on election, but your sister at tulane has not voted, could you call her? that east the level which they were dealing we frankly were flying blind at that point. part of it is tec
of government response, that technology is really just a piece of the answer. you need to have technology on your networks help identify when there's a breach to give you much greater understanding about what's happening on your networks, to look for these intrusions and these incursions into your network. that is a piece of the solution, and part of it is the caller said is really having the discussion with nations that are aggressively pursuing this. there are dozens of countries have these electronic espionage capabilities in place. a specific programs where they're targeting western networks exfiltrate data to empower their private sector, to empower their manufacturing base, the retail base, the research and development programs. they're doing at the expense of the american taxpayer. >> host: where is congress on the cybersecurity legislation? >> guest: there are more than 40 bills right now that are on the hill. covering a whole range of cybersecurity issues. some of these bills have been bouncing around for five years or more. and i recognize understand it's an incredibly complex i
within two points. the technology included the so-called orca system. many of you have read about that in the last couple of days, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure that we were targeting people getting to the polls. i'm told on election day actually got so many hits around the country as it should have from people saying this person voted this person didn't vote, they thought it was under attack and close down. so for those of you here from again detect elegies field and with interest in politics, we republicans want to talk to you. we need some help. the democratic system i think is called gordon was actually quite effective at mike retargeting. i heard one this morning it was. somebody get the call who is a democrat, who is in law school and police chief, we see you have voted. the information is publicly available. it's at 2:00 on election day, but your sister at tulane has not voted. could you call her? that is the level at which they were dealing, whereas we frankly were flying blind at that point. part of it is to elegy and not lead to a turnout
and technology and the arts and it was thanks to the division of the accomplished author and journalist walter isaacson who's the ceo of the aspen institute who approached the owner of the of cleantech, david bradley, about partnering to create a new event called the has been ideas festival. in less than a decade, the house and ideas festival takes place every summer in the beautiful aspin campus in colorado has become an influential leader in the global event arena. for the success we decided four years ago to take elements of that great show on the road and with the partnership of general and the newseum, the washington ideas for rahm was born. you'll hear the greatest journalists interviewed felt makers and leaders to discuss topics as varied the future of the entrepreneur should, global health, education, the future of china and many more subjects. so if you bear with me i would just like to offer some words of appreciation or the organizations and people that have made this event possible. it starts at the top of the list with a big thank you to margaret is the editorial director of the w
getting a transportation bill. it's a combination of things. modern technology, frankly it is a 24/7 news media. it is the fact that the members leave their families back home. you can't be a good legislator two and half days a week. you have to work at it. the combination of those things, it contributed to the partisanship and the gridlock that we have now. the answer is simple. it is called leadership. men and women of goodwill, conservative liberals, republicans, and the president -- they say it is an easy and we have to get results. >> so i want to come back to that. let's talk about the challenges that lay ahead over the next three to six months in the government. you have divided power, fiscal problems that you have to address. it's not unlike 1990. you are able to put together a pretty good package in 1990 that led to pave the way for it the deficit subsequently. something like that happen now? what was so different about 1990 than what we have now? >> well, i think it would be more difficult to do it. i came to the senate in january of 1977. when i came there, you had democrats an
technology or delivery system reform or something solves the problem, which is quite conceivable, is it really urgent that we try to settle this problem to the extent that it's a problem between now and the holidays or in the spring of 2013? again, i think the rational person would ask, you know, this is kind of like saying, well, you know, your parents had cancer when they were 60, so at the age of 20 you should go ahead and have an operation just in case, right? just to make sure. it might develop in 30 or 40 years. well, then why is it -- and this is, ultimately, a political question. it's not an economic question. why is anyone talking about fixing social security and medicare in the next six months? or the next, for that matter, five or six weeks? as part of a grand bargain? why are you even discussing this? and even if there were a few irrational people saying things, why would anyone take it seriously? i think this shows the answer. this is one of the ways that you can cut social security benefits that have been discussed as a possible part of the grand bargain. monique me
to the poll. mitt romney got fewer than john mccain and still came within two points. the technology included the so-called system some of you have maybe read about in the last couple of days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to ensure people are getting to the polls. i'm told on election day it had so many hits around the country as it should have from people saying this person voted and this person didn't. but if that was under attack it closed down. so for those of you hear from again that technology field to enter some politics, we republicans want to talk to you. [laughter] we need some help. the democratic system was quite effective at micro targeting and i've heard lots of anecdotes and one this morning that you will love that somebody gets a call that's a democrat from law school and was we see that you voted and disinformation is publicly available. was it you that voted 2:00 on election day but your sister hasn't. can you call her. that's the level at that point. that led to a turnout effort that in the end makes the difference. the increase in turnout among the b
the western pacific within a doctrine of the systems for r&d and science and technology and by means which we will rebalanced the ships were important to meet our strategic guidance in this regard. i commend that to you as the future and how we see things today as we prepare our budget for fiscal year 14 if the support in this very a4a that i mentioned to you in this regard in the defense and strategic guidance. thank you very much and i look forward to your questions. [applause] how do they plan to your strategy? >> mission by mission i think and by alliances that we have had, and let me speak to the alliance. i just spoke to the western pacific. the japanese maritime self-defense force plays that we cooperate with them to share what we call long-range search and track mission and the mission there in korea this should interest to continue to do that in a similar manner so the alliance as we have we are taking those. with regard to the kind of policies in the gulf of aden they played a major part we have a major collision maritime force that is called 151 in the gulf of the damage has been l
making sure that our workers are getting the degrees they need, including in science, technology, engineering and math, we should be doing much or at the high school level with one and two years decrease. the opportunity of immigration reform that came out loud and clear through this election where you have now 10% of the electorate, hispanic 75% of them voting for the president and you are already hearing many other republicans starting to talk about the possibility of moving on immigration reform. so there are some real opportunities that will move our economy along. if we can compromise a get together on debt, do something insist on tax reform, and then work on these problems like energy, comprehensive energy problems that are opportunity and making. so i am much were optimistic than some. imagine hubert humphrey. actually the original he gave me gordon humphrey suggested by mistake or little-known senator from new hampshire. but eventually they corrected it. >> the president has just given a press covers but i do not get the chance to hear it but he was sounding feisty on the
change and the technological innovation that we will need in order to ultimately adjust and adapt to what we have already done. the carbon tax also raises revenue in a way that could be used for a variety of different forms but it has an additional kind of benefit associated with. the narrow political discussion that we are having today. >> we see the gasoline prices coming down because the price of oil starts to fall because of all the activity produced in this country may be that would be an opportunity to increase the federal gasoline tax if we don't go to a full carbon tax. with 50 cents a gallon of the federal tax. some of the problem is from a climate perspective transportation and gasoline price petroleum is a small share of the problem. the problem is in the energy sector and without the carbon tax you are not directly getting at that. >> so, i think for the reasons that have been described the carbon tax makes enormous sense to deal with the environmental impact of energy use to like and you can design one in such a way that doesn't cause much harm for the american industries tha
always recognized the critical role technology plays in these rescue efforts. from the amber alert to his spearheading the launch of the national center's cyber tip line in 1998, this so-called 9/11 for the internet is a clearing center for reports of crimes against children on the internet and so far has received more than 1.5 million reports. ernie is a lawyer and a member of the kentucky bar. he is also a teacher, having held faculty positions at the university of louisville, the university of kentucky, and indiana university. he's been honored by his alma matter,the university of louisville as a distinguished alumnus of the louis brandeis school of law and is an outstanding alumnus of the cheng of arts and sciences. i'm pleased to report to my colleagues that ernie will not be leaving the fight for america's kids. no, his passion won't allow him to take a typical retirement. we're lucky that even as he's stepping down from his role at the helm of the center for missing and exploited children, he is a he focused exclusively on his new role as president and c.e.o. of the international c
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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